DXC Technology
  • IT & communications

What it does: Provides integrated IT services
Staff stats: 170,000 across more than 70 countries
The good bits: Professional development opportunities
The not so good bits: Training could be better structured

The DXC Technology story
DXC Technology, commonly referred to as just DXC, was created in early 2017 when Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) merged with the Enterprise Services division of Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE).

CSC was founded in Los Angeles way back in 1959 by a couple of computing industry pioneers called Roy Nutt and Fletcher Jones. Shortly after launching, the company began writing software for the likes of IBM and NASA. By 1963 it was America’s largest software company and had listed on the stock exchange. In subsequent decades, the company conquered the world through both organic growth and numerous strategic acquisitions. By the time... Show More

What it does: Provides integrated IT services
Staff stats: 170,000 across more than 70 countries
The good bits: Professional development opportunities
The not so good bits: Training could be better structured

The DXC Technology story
DXC Technology, commonly referred to as just DXC, was created in early 2017 when Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) merged with the Enterprise Services division of Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE).

CSC was founded in Los Angeles way back in 1959 by a couple of computing industry pioneers called Roy Nutt and Fletcher Jones. Shortly after launching, the company began writing software for the likes of IBM and NASA. By 1963 it was America’s largest software company and had listed on the stock exchange. In subsequent decades, the company conquered the world through both organic growth and numerous strategic acquisitions. By the time of the merger, CSC had 59,000 employees and annual revenues in excess of US$7 billion. For CSC, the jewel in the crown of HPE’s Enterprise Services division was Electronic Data Systems. This was a multinational IT equipment and services company Hewlett-Packard had bought in 2008 for US$14 billion.

DXC has 6,000 private and public sector clients spread across the globe. It is the world’s leading independent, end-to-end IT services company, one devoted to “helping clients harness the power of innovation to thrive on change”. Its local arm provides “Australian businesses with best-in-class cloud, mobility, security services, application development and modernisation, IT services, workplace, big data analytics and business process services across a range of industries, such as banking, telecommunications, insurance, government and education”.

The culture
DXC is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. This means it doesn’t discriminate based on, “disability, protected veteran status, race, colour, religious creed, national origin, citizenship, marital status, sex, sexual orientation/gender identity, age… or genetic information.” More unusually, DXC has recruitment processes in place to prevent the long-term unemployed being discriminated against and promotes ‘pay transparency’. This means you’re free to discuss your salary and your co-workers’ (if they volunteer it) with fellow employees.

DXC goes to great lengths to protect its employees against human rights violations. All staff receive annual training on the company’s Code of Ethics and Standards of Conduct. Staff are expected to “treat others equally and without discrimination of any kind” as well as “maintain the highest standards of ethics and business conduct”.    

Social contribution
DXC is committed to “a sustainable environment, human rights, responsibility and safety”. Its ‘Dandelion Program’ teaches IT skills to, and creates career opportunities for, Australians on the autism spectrum. There are now 55 graduates of the program pursuing IT careers in Australia. The company also runs coding challenges. It recently offered prizes to schoolchildren aged 10-13 who created an adventure game using the coding tool Scratch. The DXC Foundation funds programs in the areas of education (particularly STEM), health and disaster relief. DXC is a supporter of marriage equality and has conducted regular fundraisers for Cancer Council Australia, MS Australia and The Smith Family.     

The recruitment process
At the time of writing, DXC is encouraging Australian students to register their interest in joining forthcoming internship and graduate programs. It is looking for graduates who “want to be part of an amazing team delivering some of the world's most challenging and complex business and IT solutions”. The grad program is aimed at “talented graduates who are looking to join an industry focused leader which is agile and ready to meet the everyday business challenges of the new digital world”. DXC’s grad program will “help you build a solid foundation in your career, apply your learning and create value for tomorrow’s customers”.

The recruitment process will begin with an online application. This will involve uploading a cover letter, CV, academic transcript and proof you’re an Australian citizen or permanent resident. You’ll then undertake an online behavioural and aptitude assessment. If that goes well, you’ll be invited to do a video interview. The final stage involves attending an assessment centre. This is “an opportunity for you to learn more about us, experience our corporate culture and meet some of our business leaders”. If you make a good impression at the assessment centre, you can expect a job offer within a couple of days.

Remuneration
You can expect an above industry average salary but no bonuses. Compared to some other tech sector employers, the benefits are modest. In saying that you can look forward to free sporting tickets, plenty of food in the office kitchen along with the occasional dinner and Friday night drinks on the company tab, a retail discount card and subsidised health insurance.  

Career prospects
Based on how things worked at CSC, if you hit your KPIs you should be promoted, particularly in the early stages of your career. CSC offered early-career employees access to training in everything from project management to business analysis to the Seven Habits of Effective People. It seems likely that DXC will continue to offer these type of programs.  

The vibe of the place
While there is a clear organisational structure, those at all levels of it are approachable. While the workforce skews middle aged, there’s a social atmosphere in offices and most people take part in the social activities.

Star Rating: 4.4 stars

 

From the Employer:

"About DXC

As the world’s leading independent, end-to-end IT services company, DXC Technology is comprised of high-calibre professionals and technologists focused on helping our clients harness the power of innovation to thrive on change. With operations across Australia & New Zealand, DXC is uniquely positioned to lead digital transformations – creating greater value for clients, partners and shareholders, and presenting new growth opportunities for our people. 

Global scale and reach

Over 170,000 employees, across 70+ countries globally.

Capabilities and industry expertise

We provide integrated solutions that enable clients to make key digital shifts, with industry-specific experience in Banking & Capital Markets, Communications Media & Entertainment, Consumer Goods & Services, Energy, Health & Life Sciences, Insurance, Manufacturing, Travel & Transportation, and Australian Public Sector. DXC supports 9 digital offering families that comprise of 85 next-generation offerings."

 

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Reviews by DXC Technology graduate employees

  • 4.4 out of 5
    We surveyed 17 graduates working at DXC Technology. Read on to get an insider’s view on life as a graduate. 17 responses.

Graduate Stories

Wai Leong Lau DXC Technology Graduate
University of Sydney
Wai Leong studied Bachelor of Computer Science and Technology at University of Sydney
Alaxandar Anandhan
Australian National University
Alaxandar studied Master of Project Management & Master of Engineering at Australian National University
Charisse Walton
Monash University
Charisse studied Bachelor of Business (Marketing & Management) at Monash University