VicRoads
  • Engineering, R&D and manufacturing
  • Government & public services

What it does: Oversees Victoria’s roads and drivers
Staff stats: 3000
The good bits: Relaxed, inclusive and friendly work culture
The not so good bits: Interminable approval processes

The VicRoads story

The first roads in Victoria were built by the NSW Government, which dominated the south-east corner of Australia until Victoria was proclaimed a colony in its own right in 1851. At this point, heavy traffic resulting from the Gold Rush had left roads in a degraded state. In 1853 Victoria’s State Parliament passed an Act to encourage the construction of more roads and the improvement of existing ones.

Initially, road building and maintenance were overseen by a Central Road Board along with District Road Boards.

Roads went somewhat out of fashion as train tracks were laid across the state and the Central Road Board was replaced by the Board of Land and...

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What it does: Oversees Victoria’s roads and drivers
Staff stats: 3000
The good bits: Relaxed, inclusive and friendly work culture
The not so good bits: Interminable approval processes

The VicRoads story

The first roads in Victoria were built by the NSW Government, which dominated the south-east corner of Australia until Victoria was proclaimed a colony in its own right in 1851. At this point, heavy traffic resulting from the Gold Rush had left roads in a degraded state. In 1853 Victoria’s State Parliament passed an Act to encourage the construction of more roads and the improvement of existing ones.

Initially, road building and maintenance were overseen by a Central Road Board along with District Road Boards.

Roads went somewhat out of fashion as train tracks were laid across the state and the Central Road Board was replaced by the Board of Land and Works. But the arrival of the first motor vehicle in Victoria in 1897 heralded the dawn of a road-centric era. In 1913 the Country Roads Board, VicRoads predecessor, was established.

Over the following decades, it built and oversaw developmental roads, state highways, ‘isolated settler’ roads, tourist roads, forest roads and stock routes. The Country Road Board was a pioneer in road safety. In 1970, Victoria became the first state in the world to make wearing seatbelts compulsory. This was also the year the Road Safety and Traffic Authority was established. In 1976, Victoria became the first state in Australia to introduce random breath testing.

After several name changes and shifts from one to ministry to another during the 1980s, the Country Road Board and Road Safety and Traffic Authority were merged in 1989. The new entity was called the Roads Corporation of Victoria, but it came to be known by its trading name - VicRoads.          

VicRoads is a statutory corporation overseen by a CEO who reports to the Minister of Roads. It’s organised into the following operational divisions:

  • Access and Operations
  • Finance and Risk
  • Information management and technology
  • Investment and Design Services
  • Major Projects
  • People and Culture
  • Public Engagement
  • Regional Services
  • Registration and Licensing

As Victoria’s road and traffic authority, VicRoads is responsible for driver licensing, vehicle registration, regulating the towing industry, road safety policy and research and maintain, operate and regulate the arterial road network. VicRoads is headquartered in Kew and has offices throughout Melbourne and regional Victoria.  

The culture

VicRoads is committed to “creating a more diverse and inclusive workforce”. It seeks to provide a workplace “where all our people are valued, feel safe and empowered to think freely, express themselves and innovate and are able to fully contribute regardless of their gender, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or whether they identify as indigenous, or whether they have a disability.”

VicRoads has had an Indigenous Employment Program in place since 2006 and has a target of two per cent of staff being Indigenous by 2022. It has introduced initiatives, including an ‘all roles flex’ policy, to boost the number of women in leadership positions. Currently, around a third of senior management roles are filled by women. VicRoads has established ‘diversity networks’ for staff who are female, LGBTI, Indigenous, have a disability, or who identify as culturally and linguistically diverse. In line with the Victorian Government’s State Disability Plan 2016-2020, VicRoads is becoming a ‘disability-confident organisation’ (i.e. one that “can welcome people with disability in an accessible and inclusive way”.)

Social contribution

Aside from providing Victorians with a safe and well-functioning road network, VicRoads seeks to have a positive social impact in the following ways:

  • Employing Indigenous Australians, respecting Aboriginal cultural heritage when planning, constructing and maintaining roads and ensuring all VicRoads staff undertake Indigenous Cultural Awareness training
  • Being as accessible and inclusive as possible for people with a disability, be they employees or road users
  • Engaging with the community “early and often to achieve outcomes that are community-driven and make our cities, towns and regions work better”
  • Handling complaints quickly and fairly
  • Maintaining safe work practices to ensure neither staff or members of the general public are injured

The recruitment process

While it’s not required to get into the grad program, if you’re considering a career at VicRoads you may wish to do its paid 12-week Vacation Program while studying. Applications are made via the VicRoads website and students from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:  

  • Accounting/Finance
  • Commerce/Business
  • Engineering (Civil; Electrical and Electronic; Environmental; Geomatic; Mechatronics)
  • Environmental Science
  • Information Management and Technology

Presumably, you’ll also need to have a background in one of those disciplines to apply for VicRoads’ grad program. The application process involves making an online application, then being ‘assessed’. What this assessment involves is not specified. Past candidates report doing an initial phone interview, then online testing, then an assessment centre which includes a face-to-face interview at the Kew HQ.

If you’re accepted into the grad program, you’ll do three six-month-long rotations. During this time, you’ll engage in professional development activities and be mentored. You could also possibly be seconded to another government department or even a private-sector business.  

Remuneration

Grads start on $73,000, receive relocation assistance where appropriate and can also access “generous study support”. As would be expected with a public-sector employer, the leave provisions are bountiful. They include three weeks of sick leave each year as well as the option to take a year-long ‘career break’.

Career prospects

VicRoads promises staff that “with secondments, promotions and multiple new jobs every year across all our departments and locations” they will never find themselves “short on opportunity”.

The vibe of the place

If you’re comfortable operating within a public-sector work culture, want a job where you get to make a tangible difference to the lives of millions of your fellow Australians and would like the opportunity to work flexible hours while interacting with colleagues from diverse backgrounds, VicRoads will be a good fit for you.

Star Rating: Not available

 

From the employer

"VicRoads purpose is to deliver social, economic and environmental benefits to communities throughout Victoria by managing the Victorian arterial road network and its use as an integral part of the overall transport system.

VicRoads aims are to:

  • achieve ongoing reductions in the number and severity of road crashes and the resultant cost of road trauma
  • assist economic and regional development by managing and improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the road transport system
  • develop a more integrated and sustainable road transport system
  • minimise the impact of roads and traffic on the community and enhance the environment through the responsible planning and management of the transport system
  • build effective, equitable and efficient relationships with all customers by providing them with convenient access to services that meet their needs and enable VicRoads to deliver cost effective services to the community.

Our people are the key to our organisation’s success through our strategic commitment of Care, Share, Dare.

VicRoads is committed to creating a more diverse and inclusive workforce where all our people are valued, feel safe and empowered to think freely, express themselves, innovate and are able to fully contribute regardless of their gender, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or whether they identify as indigenous, or whether they have a disability.

VicRoads has both a Vacation and Graduate program.

The Vacation program is for up to 12 weeks, has flexible start and finish dates over the end of year university break, opportunities are available throughout Victoria and across many disciplines.

The Graduate program runs for 18 months, the graduate position is an ongoing position and there are three rotations of six months. Engineering graduates based in Melbourne are expected to undertake one regional rotation; regional graduates can undertake metro rotations or stay within their home region. Graduates who need to move for a rotation are given financial support to do so."


 

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Reviews by VicRoads graduate employees

  • starstarstarstarstar
    4.5 out of 5
    GradAustralia surveyed 19 graduates working at VicRoads. Read on to get an insider’s view on life as a graduate. 19 responses.

Graduate Stories

Heather Fleming, Graduate Developer at VicRoads
VicRoads
Heather studied Bachelor of Information Technology at Swinburne University (Open University Australia)
Zita Ultmann, Graduate Engineer at VicRoads
VicRoads
Zita studied Master of Design Innovation and Technology (MDIT) at RMIT University in 2016
Aleksandar Radmanovic, Graduate Engineer (Geotechnical) at VicRoads
VicRoads
Aleksandar studied Bachelor of Engineering (Civil) (Honours) at the Swinburne University of Technology (Hawthorn Campus) in 2017

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