Updating Results

WA Department of Health

4.3
  • 1,000 - 50,000 employees

About WA Department of Health

  • Government & Public Service
  • Health

What it does: Runs WA's public health system

Staff stats: Over 40,000

The good bits: Supportive team environment

The not so good bits: Bureaucratic nature of the public sector

Hiring grads with degrees in: Property & Built Environment; Sciences; Teaching, Education & Human Welfare; Engineering, Maths, IT & Computer Sciences; Finance, Accounting, Economics & Business Administration; Health & Medical Sciences; Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences; Law & Legal Studies

The WA Department of Health story

The WA Department of Health started life, in 2011, as the Public Health Department of Western Australia. In 1984, a merger with the Department of Hospital and Allied Services and Mental Health Services saw it renamed the Health Department of Western Australia. In 2001, it was again renamed and became the WA Department of Health.

WA Health includes the Department of Health (DoH), health service providers (the Hospitals) and Health Support Services (HSS) spread across Western Australia. DoH and the health service providers are governed by health support boards. Information technology, finance, business analysis and other support services are also built into DOH, the Hospitals and HSS.

WA Health also has programs that focus on the early detection and prevention of illness. By running immunisation, sun safety and cancer-screening programs, the department aims to minimise risk and ensure good health outcomes for all WA communities. WA Health provides health care to nearly 2.4 million people. In the 2016/17 financial year, WA Health managed more than 1,000,000 attendances to their emergency departments, performed 86,000 elective surgeries and delivered 25,000 babies.

As well as running WA’s public hospitals, it runs many other services including community health, disaster preparedness management, mental health, dental health and Aboriginal health. WA Health is overseen by a Director-General who reports to the Minister for Health and Mental Health.

The culture

With a positive culture that strives to “improve, promote and protect the health of Western Australians”, WA Health aims to create a supportive team environment for staff.

WA Health values diversity and strives to ensure that the workforce is representative of the community. The department has a non-discriminatory hiring policy.  It encourages young, Indigenous and disabled Australians, as well as those from diverse cultural backgrounds, to apply for positions. There are also policies in place to assist more women in senior management roles. Staff are encouraged to attend events and training programs that celebrate culture and diversity.

Social contribution

Western Australia has both a growing and ageing population. WA Health aims to deliver a patient-focused and sustainable health service to that population through improved service delivery, technological innovation, training, partnerships and policy.

WA Health also seeks to recruit and promote Indigenous Australians to help deliver culturally appropriate health services and improve Aboriginal health outcomes. To achieve this, Aboriginal cadetships are on offer, providing an income as well as work experience for Indigenous university students.  Two (2) General Corporate positions are also quarantined for Aboriginal graduates every year.

The recruitment process

WA Health recruits graduates from a variety of disciplines including medicine, nursing, clinical and non-clinical health sciences, business, finance and communications. WA Health looks for high-achieving graduates who are self-motivated, eager to learn and innovative thinkers.

The recruitment process for the Non-Clinical Graduate Program starts with an online application. A selection panel reviews all applications and invites the “most competitive applicants” to come in for the group assessment centre. Following this, the most competitive applicants are invited back for an interview, which also usually involves a panel of three people. Before a job is offered, a qualification, criminal record and health-screen background check is undertaken.

There are three grad programs offered. The Graduate Development Program (corporate) is open to those from a range of disciplines who want to provide corporate support in areas such as finance and business, ICT, data analytics, policy and project management. GradConnect is aimed at newly qualified enrolled nurses, registered nurses and midwives who are placed at a public hospital or health service or a participating private hospital. Final year medical students can also apply for medical internships. (Applicants for these internships go through a recruitment process coordinated by the Postgraduate Medical Council of WA.)

Remuneration

WA Health offers “competitive salaries” as well as salary packaging, which can reduce the amount of tax you pay. Given the variety of roles on offer, salaries differ greatly. For example, a registered nurse level 1.1 starts out on $65,697 compared to an enrolled mental health nurse at $56,500. Corporate Graduates can earn up to $69,000p.a  All department staff can access flexible working hours and various forms of leave, including generous study leave. WA Health encourages staff to eat healthily and exercise, providing free access to on-site gyms and various wellness programs.

Career prospects

There are a variety of job opportunities across many disciplines, including medical, nursing, allied health, research, information technology, communications, health administration and support services. WA Health provides plenty of access to education and training opportunities, as well as leadership and professional development programs. So, you shouldn’t have much trouble advancing your career if you’re the ambitious type.

The vibe of the place

Experiences will differ depending on where you’re working and what role you’re undertaking but the department aims to create supportive, friendly workplaces. It's a family-friendly workplace, with staff who are breastfeeding getting paid lactation breaks. Parents can also make use of childcare facilities available at Princess Margaret Hospital, QEII Medical Centre, Fremantle Hospital, Joondalup Health Campus, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Royal Perth Hospital.

Star Rating: 4.3 stars

From the Employer:

WA Health is Western Australia’s public health system. With a State spanning over 2.5 million square kilometres, it is the largest area in the world covered by a single health authority.

We employ 44,000 dedicated staff in metropolitan, regional and remote areas of the State to attend to the health needs of our growing population.

We deliver more than hospitals and health services. Our public health programs ensure that Western Australians enjoy a standard of health that is among the highest in the world.

With a positive culture that strives to “improve, promote and protect the health of Western Australians”, WA Health aims to create a supportive team environment for staff.

WA Health values diversity and strives to ensure that the workforce is representative of the community. The department has a non-discriminatory hiring policy. It encourages young, Indigenous and disabled Australians, as well as those from diverse cultural backgrounds, to apply for positions. Staff are encouraged to attend events and training programs that celebrate culture and diversity.

This investment, together with the commitment of our dedicated staff, ensures we can deliver on our vision to deliver a safe, high quality and sustainable health system for all Western Australians.

Graduate Review

4.3
Overall score based on 9 reviews
9.2
Work Hours
9
Salary
7.9
Management
7.8
Training
9.2
Work Hours
9
Salary
7.9
Management
7.8
Training
  • Working within a government department there are extremely attractive salaries and flexible working arrangements available.
  • Good workplace culture with flexibility in work arrangements and support (investment) in professional development for employees. Due to diversity of the workplace, there are a range of opportunities which means that there is always new challenges and skills to learn.
  • Flexible Work Arrangements, Working for the public sector, Working on 'once in a lifetime project'- building a new children's hospital, supportive work environment with good awards and job security.
  • There are lots of different projects going on at the same time. There are lots of different moving parts that you can get involved in.
  • The people and the opportunities.
  • For the Graduate Program there will be variances across placements in work expectations, workload and level of challenge.
  • Organisation often works in 'silos', some people have worked here for a long time- lack motivation, low innovation, unwilling to change etc. Noticed a disconnect between what is learnt at universities and the how the company works- they are a bit behind at implementing change and being current with what is being taught/learnt- for example using new emerging evidence, innovating their ways of working, use of online tools, project management skills etc. Should pull on knowledge of new university graduates and connect them with experienced workers- however there is still a difficult environment to promote meaningful change.
  • Very large organisation, which makes communication difficult across the different areas. The processes are also very bureaucratic.
  • There are still elements of the traditional public sector environment. Change can be slow and not always embraced positively.
  • The bureaucracy which can hamper initiatives designed to help people.

Opportunities

  • Perth Metropolitan Area and Regional Western Australia
B
Business & Management
C
Creative Arts
E
Engineering & Mathematics
H
Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences
I
IT & Computer Science
L
Law, Legal Studies & Justice
M
Medical & Health Sciences
P
Property & Built Environment
S
Sciences
T
Teaching & Education

Graduate Success Stories


  • Graduate stories
My role within this team is to manage cash management, debt write-offs and reporting as well as coordinating the Medical Equipment Replacement Program for NMHS.

Charli Xu

  • Graduate stories
My role within this team is to manage cash management, debt write-offs and reporting as well as coordinating the Medical Equipment Replacement Program for NMHS.

Charli Xu

Read full story
  • Graduate stories
I love how WA Health is so diverse! There are so many unique opportunities and exciting career paths you can follow!

Zoë Ashby-Deering

  • Graduate stories
I love how WA Health is so diverse! There are so many unique opportunities and exciting career paths you can follow!

Zoë Ashby-Deering

Read full story
  • Graduate stories
My role within this team is to manage cash management, debt write-offs and reporting as well as coordinating the Medical Equipment Replacement Program for NMHS.

Charli Xu

  • Graduate stories
My role within this team is to manage cash management, debt write-offs and reporting as well as coordinating the Medical Equipment Replacement Program for NMHS.

Charli Xu

Read full story
  • Graduate stories
I love how WA Health is so diverse! There are so many unique opportunities and exciting career paths you can follow!

Zoë Ashby-Deering

  • Graduate stories
I love how WA Health is so diverse! There are so many unique opportunities and exciting career paths you can follow!

Zoë Ashby-Deering

Read full story

A Day In The Life Of


  • Day in the life

Calum Abbott

Calum Abbott studied ​a ​Master of Professional Accounting ​at Edith Cowan University and is now a Finance and Business Analyst Graduate at WA Department of Health.
  • Day in the life

Calum Abbott

Calum Abbott studied ​a ​Master of Professional Accounting ​at Edith Cowan University and is now a Finance and Business Analyst Graduate at WA Department of Health.
Read full story
  • Day in the life

Daniel Dalby

Daniel Dalby studied ​a Master of Professional Accounting ​at the University of Western Australia in 2017 and is now a Finance and Business Graduate at WA Department of Health.
  • Day in the life

Daniel Dalby

Daniel Dalby studied ​a Master of Professional Accounting ​at the University of Western Australia in 2017 and is now a Finance and Business Graduate at WA Department of Health.
Read full story
  • Day in the life

Calum Abbott

Calum Abbott studied ​a ​Master of Professional Accounting ​at Edith Cowan University and is now a Finance and Business Analyst Graduate at WA Department of Health.
  • Day in the life

Calum Abbott

Calum Abbott studied ​a ​Master of Professional Accounting ​at Edith Cowan University and is now a Finance and Business Analyst Graduate at WA Department of Health.
Read full story
  • Day in the life

Daniel Dalby

Daniel Dalby studied ​a Master of Professional Accounting ​at the University of Western Australia in 2017 and is now a Finance and Business Graduate at WA Department of Health.
  • Day in the life

Daniel Dalby

Daniel Dalby studied ​a Master of Professional Accounting ​at the University of Western Australia in 2017 and is now a Finance and Business Graduate at WA Department of Health.
Read full story