Chanjun Park

University of Auckland
Associate developer
Chanjun studied Bachelor of Engineering (Software Engineering) (Hons) at University of Auckland.

What does your job involve?

I work as a developer in the International Team here at WiseTech Global. As the area of logistics is quite vast, it can be difficult to pinpoint the exact type of work that I do because it constantly changes. However, when viewed slightly more abstractly, the common thread seems to be that I work on interesting problems regarding software and code pieces of logic that fit in with a larger system.

How did you become interested in software development?

I lived and studied in New Zealand and now have a degree in Engineering specialised in Software. When reflecting on the things that interested me, it seems obvious now that software would be the direction I would take. Puzzles and meticulous games with logic could entertain me without end, while also ideas related to creativity continued to fascinate me. When bringing those worlds together, software and code seems to sit neatly in the middle.

Could someone with a different background do your job?

The people that gather at WiseTech and work towards building good software every day are from a variety of different backgrounds, but share a common goal and a positive attitude towards learning and improvement.

What's the coolest thing about your job?

A definite plus of working here is the level of autonomy that an employee has. While there are aspects that are strongly structured (and rightfully so), there is very little sense of an overarching hierarchy. This means that when I have any ideas, I can be confident that they will be considered and validated on their merits.

What are the limitations of your job?

While the autonomy that an employee has is beneficial and preferable, it also means that responsibility is largely on you. Spoon-feeding is rare and improvement is self-directed and self-motivated. Although it can be a difficult adjustment, the various team-leaders and seniors here likely recognise that this leads to better motivated and reliable employees.

3 pieces of advice for yourself when you were a student...

  1. Be open to being wrong
  2. Value learning
  3. Take advantage of the time and resources available to you.