Clean Energy Regulator
  • Energy & utilities
  • Environment & agriculture
  • Government & public services

What it does: Drives carbon-emission reductions
Staff stats: 335
The good bits: Helping save the planet
The not so good bits: Bureaucratic work practices  
Hiring grads with degrees in:  Engineering, Maths, IT & Computer Sciences; Finance, Accounting, Economics & Business Administration; Sciences 

The Clean Energy Regulator story
The Clean Energy Regulator come into being in early 2012 as a result of the passing of the Clean Energy Regulator Act 2011. It’s an independent statutory authority (one that functions as a regulatory agency) and is part of the Department of the Environment and Energy. The Clean Energy Regulator is led by a CEO who reports to the Minister for the Environment and Energy.

As its name suggests, it is “responsible for administering legislation that will reduce carbon emissions...

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What it does: Drives carbon-emission reductions
Staff stats: 335
The good bits: Helping save the planet
The not so good bits: Bureaucratic work practices  
Hiring grads with degrees in:  Engineering, Maths, IT & Computer Sciences; Finance, Accounting, Economics & Business Administration; Sciences 

The Clean Energy Regulator story
The Clean Energy Regulator come into being in early 2012 as a result of the passing of the Clean Energy Regulator Act 2011. It’s an independent statutory authority (one that functions as a regulatory agency) and is part of the Department of the Environment and Energy. The Clean Energy Regulator is led by a CEO who reports to the Minister for the Environment and Energy.

As its name suggests, it is “responsible for administering legislation that will reduce carbon emissions and increase the use of clean energy”. In practice, this means activities related to measuring, managing, reducing or offsetting Australia’s carbon emissions. The Clean Energy Regulator is responsible for administering the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Scheme, Renewable Energy Target and Emissions Reduction Fund.  

The culture
The Clean Energy Regulator supports diversity. It goes to considerable lengths to create “an environment free from discrimination, patronage and favouritism”. It gives a leg-up to Indigenous and disabled candidates through its Indigenous Trainee Program and participation in the Australian Public Service’s RecruitAbility scheme. (This supports the employment and career development of people with a disability.)

There are internal networking groups for staff who are female, LGBTIQ or from a “non-Anglo background”. To make life easier for those with caring responsibilities, flexible working arrangements, including job sharing, are available. There are on-site prayer and parent’s rooms. There is mandatory training around bullying and harassment prevention. A network of “workplace harassment contact officers” are available to assist anyone who feels unfairly treated.   

Social contribution
By working for a powerful regulatory agency devoted to “accelerating carbon abatement for Australia”, staff at the Clean Energy Regulator are literally helping save the world.

The recruitment process
The Clean Energy Regulator recruits those with degrees in: Environmental Science and Management; Development Studies (environmental sustainability); Science (geology) and Engineering. (You’ll need to have maintained a credit average.)  

Applicants should be team players with excellent analytical and communication skills. Ideally, they will also be “practical, results-oriented people who are able to work under pressure, occasionally in difficult environments, meet tight deadlines and who are proactive in getting out and about and making contacts”. You’ll also need to be an Australian citizen and be willing to live in Canberra.

The recruitment process will involve an online application and video interview. If you make the shortlist, you’ll then be invited to the Canberra office to take part in group exercises and do a panel interview. Before receiving a formal offer, you’ll need to obtain a baseline security clearance. (This will require supplying extensive personal information.) You’ll also need to complete a health assessment form.

The one-year grad program is designed to provide participants “with the opportunity to develop a well-rounded knowledge of the work of the agency, gain experience in the public sector and develop a deep understanding of Australia’s biggest policy developments”. It involves rotations to different areas of the agency, an intensive development program and working with your fellow grads to deliver a “major project”. You’ll be paired up with both a mentor and a buddy. By the end of the program, you will have the knowledge and skills to “be an effective technical specialist within the Clean Energy Regulator”.

Remuneration
Like most public-sector employers, the Clean Energy Regulator offers generous super and leave entitlements. Relocation assistance is provided to those grads who need to move to the ACT. Grads get an AP3 ranking, entitling them to a salary between $59,201 – $64,084.

Career prospects
As is the case with most public-sector employers, you’ll need to be patient when it comes to promotions. Given the small size of the agency and the specialised nature of its work, you can expect to have to bide your time waiting for more senior positions to open up. However, after completing the grad program, you will possess a skill set of interest to many public-sector and private-sector employers.

You’ll have plenty of opportunities to expand your range of marketable skills. The Clean Energy Regulator’s Enterprise Agreement specifies, “An employee may undertake learning and development activities approved by their supervisor.” Even better, it states, “Employees undertaking formal study which is relevant to the APS may be eligible for reimbursement of course fees and/or a period of study leave.”

The vibe of the place
Current and former staff are positive about the Clean Energy Regulator, praising its flexible work practices, accessible managers, diverse workforce and friendly culture. They also report enjoying the opportunity to do interesting work related to an important issue.  

Star Rating: 4.4 stars   

 

From the Employer:

"Who we are

The Clean Energy Regulator is the Government body responsible for administering legislation to reduce carbon emissions and increase the use of clean energy. We do this through the administration of the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting scheme, Renewable Energy Target, Emissions Reduction Fund and safeguard mechanism.

Our purpose is to accelerate carbon abatement. Everything we do is connected to measuring, managing, reducing or offsetting Australia’s carbon emissions.

The culture

The Clean Energy Regulator has a strong focus on agency culture and ensuring staff feel positive about their work environment. Our staff have described the agency culture as friendly, inclusive, committed and collaborative.

The agency is relatively small compared to others with 335 employees. This contributes to a culture of collaboration in which you get to work across many areas and will always find another staff member willing to help with any task. Also due to the size, and the agency culture, you often will liaise with executive staff, adding to the collaborative environment of the agency.

The vibe of the place

You can expect to be located in our city office. Our agency culture has a strong focus on collaboration, which means there will always be opportunities or you to meet and work alongside your peers. This can take place through our social club or other agency groups and committees. The Clean Energy Regulator is a welcoming and friendly place to work, we have pride in the work we do and our staff are always looking for innovative solutions to problems. Along with the hard working environment, it is also a fun place to work with many social activities for you to get involved in.

Career prospects

You will receive the necessary training and development to be effective in your role, and develop the foundational skills required to launch you APS career.

Through participation in the program, graduates will gain relevant knowledge and skills in government administration, as well as the technical expertise required to be a specialist within the Clean Energy Regulator.

What can a student expect on the job?

During your graduate year you will work in three areas of our agency. The rotation structure allows us to give our graduates a wide range of experiences. By working across business areas, graduates develop an understanding of the agency’s work in the administration of climate change policies and regulation of carbon and renewable energy markets.

Rotations provide opportunities to network and learn from different experts across the agency and Australian Public Service to help inform your future career decisions.

Recruitment process

As a regulatory agency working in a complex environment we are looking for graduates from varied backgrounds, with high-level analytical and communication skills and the ability to work well in a team environment. Successful applicants will be practical, results-oriented people who are able to work under pressure, occasionally in difficult environments, meet tight deadlines and who are proactive in getting out and about and making contacts.

Recent graduates have had degrees in Environmental Science and Management, Development Studies (environmental sustainability), Science (Geology) and Engineering.

The recruitment process will likely involve an online application, video interview, group exercises and interviews with a panel in Canberra. If you receive an offer there is a requirement to obtain a baseline security clearance, this will involve supplying extensive personal information. We offer relocation assistance to those who are successful from outside the ACT.

You can find out more information on the careers page of the Clean Energy Regulator website."


 

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Reviews by Clean Energy Regulator graduate employees

  • starstarstarstarstar
    4.4 out of 5
    GradAustralia surveyed 6 graduates working at Clean Energy Regulator. Read on to get an insider’s view on life as a graduate. 6 responses.

Graduate Stories

Joshua Otten Clean Energy Regulator Graduate
Clean Energy Regulator
Josh studied Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) at Australian National University
Lindsay Bowland Clean Energy Regulator Graduate
Clean Energy Regulator
Lindsay studied Bachelor of Environmental Science and Management/Masters of Environmental Management at University of Newcastle
Julia Sheldrake Clean Energy Regulator Graduate
Clean Energy Regulator
Julia studied Master of International Relations, Bachelor of Arts (Honours) at University of Melbourne and Keio University Japan