Bureau of Meteorology
  • Government & public services

What it does: Predicts the weather
Staff stats: Around 1600
The good bits: Rewarding work helping the community
The not so good bits: Remote travel, some shift work
Hiring grads with degrees in: Engineering, Maths, IT & Computer Sciences; Sciences

The Bureau of Meteorology story
In 1906, Australia’s recently created federal government passed the Meteorology Act. This brought together the various state meteorological services then in existence. A couple of years later, the Bureau of Meteorology came into existence on January 1, 1908. Ever since, it has been the main provider of weather forecasts, warnings and observations to Australians.

The Bureau’s head office is in Melbourne. It has regional offices in all state and territory capitals and field offices on islands near Australia and in Antarctica. The Bureau’s parent...

Show More

What it does: Predicts the weather
Staff stats: Around 1600
The good bits: Rewarding work helping the community
The not so good bits: Remote travel, some shift work
Hiring grads with degrees in: Engineering, Maths, IT & Computer Sciences; Sciences

The Bureau of Meteorology story
In 1906, Australia’s recently created federal government passed the Meteorology Act. This brought together the various state meteorological services then in existence. A couple of years later, the Bureau of Meteorology came into existence on January 1, 1908. Ever since, it has been the main provider of weather forecasts, warnings and observations to Australians.

The Bureau’s head office is in Melbourne. It has regional offices in all state and territory capitals and field offices on islands near Australia and in Antarctica. The Bureau’s parent agency is the Department of the Environment. The Bureau is run by the Director of Meteorology, who reports to the Minister for the Environment.     

The culture
The Bureau has a rigorous commitment to diversity. It “seeks to respect and value the diversity in the workplace by helping to prevent and eliminate unlawful discrimination and to assist staff to balance their work and personal life responsibilities”. It is also particularly concerned to “increase employment and subsequent career development opportunities for Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) people”.

Social contribution
For most people weather predictions don’t impact anything other than their weekend plans. But for a range of weather-sensitive industries and organisations – emergency services, defence, aviation, shipping, resources, agriculture and water – reliable weather forecasts can mean the difference between life and death. As part of the Bureau of Meteorology, you’ll be helping provide essential forecast, warning and information services that protect lives and property, support national security and environmental sustainability, and increase economic productivity.

The recruitment process
These days, the Bureau of Meteorology communicates with Australian citizens, government organisations and businesses through channels including a website, the traditional media, and an ever-growing number of mobile and social media platforms. The Bureau is therefore particularly interested in grads who can help it continue to deliver environmental information to a range of different audiences.

You don’t need to have studied meteorology to work at the Bureau of Meteorology. Grads with degrees in Computing, IT, Physical Sciences, Applied Mathematics and Science are welcome to apply. The Bureau favours candidates who are strong academic achievers, passionate about new technologies and interested in the climate and the environment. Candidates who are innovative and flexible and who have strong communication and problem-solving skills are also preferred.

Grads have three options. The Meterology stream involves graduates undertaking a 9-month internationally recognised program of study governed by the World Meteorological Organisation. After learning how to analyse the atmosphere and oceans and provide information on the weather and climate, grads are employed by the Bureau as qualified Meterologists. They can then specialise in areas such as severe weather, tropical meteorology, thunderstorms, aviation or climate.     

If you are an Indigenous Australian you can apply for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Graduate Program. Those from any discipline can apply for this 12-month program. If accepted, they are exposed to a range of areas and can go on to careers in admin, communications, environmental science, HR, meteorology or project management.

Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander students can also apply for the Indigenous Australian Government Developement Program (IAGDP). This entry level role gives on-the-job experience and access to learning and development to participants while they complete a Diploma of Government. Streams in this diploma include project management, human resource management, procurement and contract management, or statistics.

The Bureau uses a range of assessment tools when recruiting. These include “written applications, interviews, work competency assessments and referee reports”. After completing an online application that includes your CV and a statement detailing how you meet the selection criteria for the grad program you’re applying to join, you’ll probably sit one interview with a selection panel. This can be done in person or via the telephone or video conferencing. In conjunction with the interview, you may also need to do a ‘work competency assessment’. This can involve a written test, presentation or computer-based task. You will also need to undergo a pre-employment medical assessment and may need to get a security clearance before receiving an offer.    

Career prospects
Professional development opportunities are available for staff at all levels. Graduates who undetake the Graduate Diploma of Meterology will finish their program as fully qualified Meterologist with international recognition of this program. Plus, you can apply for incredible assignments, such as living in Antarctica for a year, early in your career.

The vibe of the place
Somewhat unlike some public service organisations, the Bureau is full of people passionate about doing challenging, interesting work that has a real impact on the lives and livelihoods of their fellow citizens. Graduates will be working within a team of like-minded individuals whose work affects the lives of millions of Australian's, such as those impacted by natural disasters and extreme weather events.

 

From the Employer:

"Australian communities depend on the Bureau’s essential forecast, warning and information services to protect lives and property, support national security and environmental sustainability, promote industry productivity and enhance societal well-being. Many important, weather-sensitive industries rely on our services for their own effective operation. These include emergency services, defence, aviation, shipping, resources, agriculture and water. We communicate directly with all Australians through various channels such as briefings, our website, social media and mobile platforms—and also through the media.

Graduate roles at the Bureau

We’re looking for graduates who will help us transform the way that we bring environmental information to the Australian community. Do you have a record of strong academic achievement, an interest in working with the latest technology—from supercomputing to ever-evolving modelling software—and a passion for weather, climate, water, ocean and space weather information? If you thrive in an environment where great communication, problem solving, innovation and flexibility are valued, and teams collaborate to achieve the best outcomes, you’ll fit right in at the Bureau.

We offer a wide range of job specialties—it’s not just about forecasting the weather, although that’s an important part of what we do! We encourage applications from all degree streams to join our flexible and diverse workplace, with mentoring support, career development and colleagues who are as passionate as you about making a difference to people’s lives. With offices around Australia and positions in locations as far away as Antarctica, we offer excellent opportunities to build a varied and rewarding career.

Graduate opportunities are available in the following programs:

  • Graduate Diploma in Meteorology
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Graduate Program

Graduate Diploma in Meteorology 

Being a meteorologist is about understanding the atmosphere and its effects on the Earth's surface, the oceans and people’s lives and livelihoods. This includes analysing the state of the atmosphere and oceans, and providing forecasts, warnings, information and advice on weather and climate. Communicating weather information effectively is also an area of focus for meteorologists. Graduates may go on to a wide variety of specialisations, such as severe weather, tropical meteorology, thunderstorms, aviation or climate.

You will study the Graduate Diploma in Meteorology in Melbourne. This nationally accredited diploma satisfies the learning outcomes for the Basic Instruction Package for Meteorologists, as governed by the World Meteorological Organization—so it is also internationally recognised.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Pathways

We have a strong commitment to increasing employment opportunities and improving career pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through a range of opportunities - these include:

  • Graduate program
  • Entry-level employment and study program

 Our graduate program offers Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islander graduates the opportunity to kick-start a career and gain exposure to diverse areas across the organisation. More Information

We also offer entry-level opportunities to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through the Indigenous Australian Government Development Program (IAGDP). Alongside on-the-job experience and access to learning and development opportunities, participants complete a Diploma of Government with streams offered in project management, human resource management, procurement and contract management or statistics. More Information

Graduate Meteorology Program
As part of our commitment to improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment outcomes we have an Affirmative Measures position and also invite applications for this opportunity. More Information

What we’re looking for

We are inviting applications from graduates from the following subject areas:

  • Physical sciences
  • Applied mathematics
  • Science and research
  • Information technology and computing
  • All disciplines, through the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Graduate Programs

Areas of Specialisation

Computer science & IT, Maths, statistics & related, Physics & related"

 

Hide

Jobs & Internships

Graduate Stories

Lizzie Donnovan Meteorology Graduate
Bureau of Meteorology
Lizzie Donovan studied Meteorology

Videos

Advice

OnTheJob_BOM_Naomi
Employer Insight

GradAustralia met with Naomi Benger to learn about life on the job as a Graduate Meteorologist at the Bureau of Meteorology.

Save